DHAMPUR SUGAR MILLS LTD.
About Us > History

Dhampur Sugar Mills was established in 1933, and began it’s operations in a small town called Dhampur located in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India , with a sugar mill having a crushing capacity of 300 tonnes of cane per day.

Leadership begins with a vision

Lala Ram Narain ji [1880 – 1943], founder of the Dhampur Group, took on the task of supporting his entire family at a very young age and shouldered his responsibilities with fortitude and confidence. During this period he worked with a forest contractor but the craving to press forward and accomplish, burnt deep within his heart. He soon spotted an opportunity in supply of wooden sleepers, for laying new railway tracks and boldly struck out on his own. His determination defied logistics and laid the foundations of the Dhampur Group.

From such modest beginnings, he hand-crafted the destiny of the corporate house that today, directly and indirectly, provides employment and livelihood to a large number of individuals and families of the rural India. 
In the early 1930’s, while the strategists debated over choice of role models on which to shape the Indian economy, Lala Ram Narain ji anticipated the need for industrialization. The outcome of his foresight was investment in two sugar mills – one at Dhampur and the other as a 50% partner, at Bareilly, in Uttar Pradesh. 
The Dhampur Sugar Mill was commissioned in 1933. 

Shri Murli Manohar ji
 [1916 – 1964], eldest son of Lala Ram Narain ji took up the baton at an early age to carry forward the vision and legacy of his father. Even in face of a youth spent in comparatively difficult circumstances, the indomitable will he inherited from his father manifested itself in 1947 when the Indian Sugar Industry was passing through a challenging phase.

He resisted efforts to divest the Dhampur unit and took over the Managing Agency of the factory agreeing to pay a fixed dividend to his partners. He accomplished this task with great élan and successfully turned around the fortunes of the Dhampur factory. 

He passed away at the young age of 48 but the path for the future generations had already been etched.